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Research Papers: Melting and Solidification

Low-Temperature Melting of Silver Nanoparticles in Subcooled and Saturated Water

[+] Author and Article Information
Soochan Lee

School for Engineering of Matter,
Transport and Energy,
Arizona State University,
501 E Tyler Mall, ECG 303,
Tempe, AZ 85287-6106
e-mail: slee207@asu.edu

Patrick E. Phelan

School for Engineering of Matter,
Transport and Energy,
Arizona State University,
501 E Tyler Mall, ECG 303,
Tempe, AZ 85287-6106
e-mail: phelan@asu.edu

Robert A. Taylor

School of Mechanical and
Manufacturing Engineering,
University of New South Wales,
Sydney 2052, Australia
e-mail: robert.taylor@unsw.edu.au

Ravi Prasher

School for Engineering of Matter,
Transport and Energy,
Arizona State University,
501 E Tyler Mall, ECG 303,
Tempe, AZ 85287-6106
e-mail: prasher.ravi@gmail.com

Lenore Dai

School for Engineering of Matter,
Transport and Energy,
Arizona State University,
501 E Tyler Mall, ECG 273,
Tempe, AZ 85287-6106
e-mail: lenore.dai@asu.edu

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received March 29, 2015; final manuscript received October 19, 2015; published online January 27, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Heat Transfer 138(5), 052301 (Jan 27, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-15-1233; doi: 10.1115/1.4032310 History: Received March 29, 2015; Revised October 19, 2015

Continuous, laser-heated boiling heat transfer experiments with silver nanofluids were conducted to identify the nonequilibrium melting behavior of silver nanoparticles in de-ionized (DI) water. Experimental results with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest that surface melting of silver nanoparticles (which have a bulk melting point of 961 °C) can occur at ambient pressure when particles are suspended in saturated, and even subcooled (e.g., <100 °C) water due to the localized (volumetric) heat absorption. These findings are supported by calculating a temperature-dependent Hamaker constant of silver nanofluid—i.e., the interaction between interfaces (Ag-melt-water) at the melting temperature. This finding is significant because of the difficulty to identify the melting of silver nanoparticles in water at present, even though it is important to understand such potential melting to use aqueous silver nanofluids in solar applications.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Modeled geometry of surface melting of silver nanoparticles in water [15]: (a) actual spherical geometry and (b) modeled planar geometry

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Fig. 2

(a) Schematic diagram of setup for boiling experiment of silver nanofluid with laser input and (b) schematic representation of test cell with thermal and optical processes

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Fig. 3

TEM images of 0.1% by volume, 20 nm Ag particles (a) before heating, (b) after laser heating in subcooled fluid, and (c) after laser heating in saturated fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Histograms of PSDs measured from the TEM images in Fig. 3 of (a) before heating Ag nanoparticles, (b) after laser heating in subcooled fluid, and (c) after laser heating in saturated fluid

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Volume weight-based Ag nanoparticles distribution measured with DLS, the Nicomp 380/ZLS, PSD of 0.1% by volume, 20 nm, Ag nanofluid (a) before heating, (b) after laser heating in subcooled fluid, and (c) after laser heating in saturated fluid

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