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Technical Brief

The Effects of Ambient Pressure on the Initiation of the Freezing Process for a Water Droplet on a Cold Surface

[+] Author and Article Information
Zheyan Jin

School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics,
Tongji University,
Shanghai 200092, China
e-mail: zheyanjin@tongji.edu.cn

Yingpei Zhao

School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics,
Tongji University,
Shanghai 200092, China
e-mail: zhaoyingpei99@163.com

Dongyu Sui

School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics,
Tongji University,
Shanghai 200092, China
e-mail: sdy890909@126.com

Zhigang Yang

School of Automotive Studies,
Shanghai Automotive Wind Tunnel Center,
Tongji University,
Shanghai 201804, China
e-mail: zhigangyang@tongji.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received August 6, 2015; final manuscript received April 6, 2016; published online May 3, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Gennady Ziskind.

J. Heat Transfer 138(8), 084502 (May 03, 2016) (4 pages) Paper No: HT-15-1527; doi: 10.1115/1.4033377 History: Received August 06, 2015; Revised April 06, 2016

This study investigated the effect of air pressure on the freezing process of a water droplet on a cold surface. A common belief is that bulk liquid water is incompressible and air pressure does not affect the freezing point of the bulk liquid water over a wide range of pressure. However, our results demonstrated that, for a water droplet on a cold surface, its freezing process started early at lower ambient pressures. Such a phenomenon can be explained by the effects of the evaporative cooling.

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Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Topics: Pressure , Freezing , Drops , Water
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Images of droplet freezing process: (a) p =  1.01×105 Pa and (b) p =  0.68×105 Pa

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Fig. 3

Images of droplet evaporation process: (a) p =  1.01×105 Pa and (b) p =  0.68×105 Pa

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Evolution of (r/r0)2 as a function of t/r02

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