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Research Papers: Heat and Mass Transfer

Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulation of Single and Two-Phase Vortex Flow—A Comparison of Flow Field and Energy Separation

[+] Author and Article Information
Gaurav Sharma

Department of Space and Rocktery,
BIT Mesra,
Ranchi, India

Sumana Ghosh

Department of Chemical Engineering,
IIT Roorkee,
Roorkee 247667, India
e-mail: ghoshfch@iitr.ac.in

Srinibas Karmakar

Department of Aerospace Engineering,
IIT Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, India

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received October 8, 2015; final manuscript received March 26, 2016; published online May 3, 2016. Editor: Portonovo S. Ayyaswamy.

J. Heat Transfer 138(8), 082003 (May 03, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-15-1642; doi: 10.1115/1.4033388 History: Received October 08, 2015; Revised March 26, 2016

In the present work, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation has been performed to investigate single and two-phase vortex tube. Air in compressed form and partially condensed phase are used as working fluid, respectively. Simulation has been carried out using commercial CFD software package fluent 6.3.26. A detailed study has been performed to generate the profiles of velocity, pressure, and pathlines. These profiles provide an insight on how the process of energy separation as well as the flow field in the vortex tube gets affected on introduction of a liquid phase. The result shows that in case of cryogenic vortex tube, the flow reversal takes place closer to wall due to presence of a very thin wall adhering liquid film, while, in single-phase flow vortex tube, flow reversal is observed at the central portion. The model also predicts that presence of recirculation zone near warm end diminishes the refrigeration effect of vortex tube for two-phase flow.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Computational domain

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Fig. 3

Cold exit temperature separation as a function of cold mass fraction

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Fig. 2

Meshed geometry (a) complete domain and (b) partial domain

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Fig. 4

Total temperature separation as a function of cold mass fraction

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Fig. 5

Total temperature (K) contour at a hot outlet gauge pressure 100,000 Pa

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Fig. 6

Evolution of liquid phase inside the two-phase vortex tube with time (a) t = 0.3 ms, (b) t = 1.4 ms, (c) t = 12 ms, and (d) zoomed view

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Fig. 7

Total temperature (K) contour of two-phase vortex tube (a) full view and (b) zoomed view

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Fig. 8

Radial profile of total temperature with axial locations as a parameter (a) single-phase vortex flow and (b) two-phase vortex flow

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Fig. 9

Pathlines in vortex tube (a) single-phase vortex flow and (b) two-phase vortex flow

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Fig. 10

Radial profile of axial velocity with axial locations as a parameter (a) single-phase vortex flow and (b) two-phase vortex flow

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Fig. 11

Radial profile of swirl velocity with axial locations as a parameter (a) single-phase vortex flow and (b) two-phase vortex flow

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Fig. 12

Axial velocity (m/s) contour of vortex tube (a) single-phase vortex flow and (b) two-phase vortex flow

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Fig. 13

Pressure (Pa) contour of vortex tube (a) single-phase vortex flow and (b) two-phase vortex flow

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