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Research Papers: Porous Media

Heat Transfer and Entropy Generation Analyses of Forced Convection Through Porous Media Using Pore Scale Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
Mehrdad Torabi

Young Researchers and Elite Club,
Central Tehran Branch,
Islamic Azad University,
Tehran, Iran

Mohsen Torabi

The George W. Woodruff School
of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mails: Mohsen.Torabi@my.cityu.edu.hk;
Mohsen.Torabi@gatech.edu

G. P. Peterson

The George W. Woodruff School
of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: Bud.Peterson@gatech.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 22, 2016; final manuscript received July 5, 2016; published online August 30, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Dr. Antonio Barletta.

J. Heat Transfer 139(1), 012601 (Aug 30, 2016) (10 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1291; doi: 10.1115/1.4034181 History: Received May 22, 2016; Revised July 05, 2016

The objective of the current investigation is to investigate the entropy generation inside porous media utilizing a pore scale modeling approach. The current investigation improves the thermodynamics performance of the recent analysis (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2016, 99, pp. 303–316) by considering different cross-sectional configurations and analyzing the thermal system for various Reynolds numbers, porosities, and a comparison between the previous and current investigation. The Nusselt number, the dimensionless volume-averaged entropy generation rate, Bejan number, and performance evaluation criterion (PEC) are all presented and discussed. The dimensionless volume-averaged entropy generation rate was found to increase with increasing Reynolds number, with the increase being higher for lower porosity medium. A slight variation of the dimensionless volume-averaged entropy generation rate is observed for higher Reynolds numbers which is confirmed for both cross-sectional configurations. Examination of the Bejan number demonstrates heat transfer irreversibility (HTI) dominance for most of the Reynolds number ranges examined. The results indicate that the longitudinal elliptical cross-sectional configuration with porosity equals to 0.53 provides superior performance when applying the performance evaluation criterion utilized.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometric model: (a) heat exchanger bundles with longitudinal elliptical cross-sectional configuration and (b) structural unit with periodic and symmetry boundaries

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Fig. 2

Geometric model: transverse elliptical cross-sectional configuration

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Fig. 3

Code validation for square cross-sectional configuration with ϕ=0.84

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Fig. 4

Streamlines of longitudinal elliptical and transverse elliptical cross-sectional configurations for different exposure Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 5

Isothermal lines of longitudinal elliptical and transverse elliptical cross-sectional configurations for different exposure Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 6

Nusselt number variations of longitudinal elliptical and transverse elliptical cross-sectional configurations for different Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 7

The local entropy generation rate contours of longitudinal elliptical cross-sectional configuration for different exposure Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 8

The local entropy generation rate contours of transverse elliptical cross-sectional configuration for different exposure Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 9

The dimensionless volume-averaged entropy generation rate of longitudinal elliptical and transverse elliptical cross-sectional configurations for different Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 10

The Bejan number of longitudinal elliptical and transverse elliptical cross-sectional configurations for different Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 11

The performance evaluation criterion of longitudinal elliptical and transverse elliptical cross-sectional configurations for different Reynolds numbers and porosities

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Fig. 12

The performance evaluation criterion comparison of square and circular [23], longitudinal elliptical, and transverse elliptical cross-sectional configurations for different Reynolds numbers and porosities

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