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Research Papers: Radiative Heat Transfer

Enhanced Photon Tunneling by Surface Plasmon–Phonon Polaritons in Graphene/hBN Heterostructures

[+] Author and Article Information
B. Zhao

George W. Woodruff School
of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332

Z. M. Zhang

Fellow ASME
George W. Woodruff School
of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 9, 2016; final manuscript received August 30, 2016; published online October 18, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Alan McGaughey.

J. Heat Transfer 139(2), 022701 (Oct 18, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1260; doi: 10.1115/1.4034793 History: Received May 09, 2016; Revised August 30, 2016

Enhancing photon tunneling probability is the key to increasing the near-field radiative heat transfer between two objects. It has been shown that hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and graphene heterostructures can enable plentiful phononic and plasmonic resonance modes. This work demonstrates that heterostructures consisting of a monolayer graphene on an hBN film can support surface plasmon–phonon polaritons that greatly enhance the photon tunneling and outperform individual structures made of either graphene or hBN. Both the thickness of the hBN films and the chemical potential of graphene can affect the tunneling probability, offering potential routes toward passive or active control of near-field heat transfer. The results presented here may facilitate the system design for near-field energy harvesting, thermal imaging, and radiative cooling applications based on two-dimensional materials.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Schematic of near-field radiative heat transfer between two graphene/hBN heterostructures. (b) Illustration of the regions for calculating the reflection coefficients.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Sheet conductivity of graphene with different chemical potentials: (a) real part and (b) imaginary part. The values are normalized by σ0=e2/4ℏ. (c) Real part of the dielectric function of hBN. The shaded areas indicate the two hyperbolic regions of hBN.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparison of the radiative heat flux as a function of gap spacing d between the heterostructures shown in Fig. 1(a), graphene monolayers (same structures without the hBN film),and hBN films (same structures without graphene). The temperatures of the emitter and receiver are set at 300 and 0 K, respectively. The film thickness is h = 50 nm and the chemical potential of graphene is μ = 0.37 eV.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Photon tunneling probability contours for different structures: (a) graphene monolayers, (b) hBN films, and (c) heterostructures shown in Fig. 1(a). The dashed lines indicate the two Reststrahlen bands of hBN. The parameters are d = 20 nm, h = 50 nm, and μ = 0.37 eV.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Spectral heat flux between two graphene monolayers, hBN films, and graphene/hBN heterostructures. The parameters used are the same as for Fig. 3.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Photon tunneling probability contours for different graphene/hBN heterostructures. The gap distance is fixed at 20 nm and the other parameters are as follows: (a) h = 200 nm and μ = 0.37 eV; (b) h = +∞ (semi-infinite) and μ = 0.37 eV; (c) h = 50 nm and μ = 0.2 eV; and (d) h = 50 nm and μ = 0.6 eV.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Photon tunneling probability contour for the graphene/hBN/graphene heterostructure

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Comparison of the spectral heat flux for the graphene/hBN and graphene/hBN/graphene structures. The parameters are d = 20 nm, h = 50 nm, and μ = 0.37 eV.

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