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Research Papers: Heat Transfer in Manufacturing

Determination of Metal/Die Interfacial Heat Transfer Coefficients in Squeeze Casting of Wrought Aluminum Alloy 7075 With Variations in Section Thicknesses and Applied Pressures

[+] Author and Article Information
Xuezhi Zhang

Department of Mechanical, Automotive
and Material Engineering,
University of Windsor,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: zhang11w@uwindsor.ca

Li Fang

Department of Mechanical, Automotive
and Material Engineering,
University of Windsor,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: fangl@uwindsor.ca

Henry Hu

Department of Mechanical, Automotive
and Material Engineering,
University of Windsor,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: huh@uwindsor.ca

Xueyuan Nie

Department of Mechanical, Automotive and
Material Engineering,
University of Windsor,
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada
e-mail: xnie@uwindsor.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received November 11, 2015; final manuscript received September 22, 2016; published online October 26, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Heat Transfer 139(2), 022101 (Oct 26, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: HT-15-1724; doi: 10.1115/1.4034855 History: Received November 11, 2015; Revised September 22, 2016

Squeeze casting of wrought aluminum 7075 was carried out on a 75-ton hydraulic press. Metal/die interface heat transfer phenomena in squeeze casting of the alloy were investigated. To facilitate experimental measurements, a five-step casting mold was designed for the experiments. The five-step casting consisted of five different section thicknesses of 2, 4, 8, 12, and 20 mm. Squeeze casing experiments were performed under the applied hydraulic pressures of 30, 60, and 90 MPa. Temperatures were measured at the casting surface and at various specific locations inside the die. At each step, thermocouples were placed at 2, 4, and 6 mm away from the inside die face. Based on the measured temperature results, the interfacial heat transfer coefficients (IHTCs) and heat fluxes were determined by solving the one-dimensional transient heat conduction equation with the inverse method. With increasing the casting section thicknesses from 2 to 20 mm, the peak IHTC values varied from 1683.46 W/m2 K to 9473.23 W/m2 K, 2174.78 W/m2 K to 13,494.05 W/m2 K, and 3873.45 W/m2 K to 15,483.01 W/m2 K for the applied hydraulic pressures of 30, 60, and 90 MPa, respectively.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Graphical installations of temperature sensor units (TSUs), pressure sensor units (PSUs), and data-acquisition system

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Fig. 2

Three-dimensional model showing the (a) front view, (b) side view, and (c) isometric view of the five-step casting

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Fig. 3

Configuration of installation of the K-type thermocouples, the unit is in millimeters

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Fig. 4

One-dimensional inverse heat conduction problem to be solved for heat transfer coefficient, TSU (temperature sensor unit)

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Fig. 5

One-dimensional heat transfer at the interface between the casting and the die

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Fig. 6

Flow chart of the inverse algorithm for IHTC estimation at the metal/die interface

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Fig. 7

Five-step squeeze castings with the applied pressures of (a) 30, (b) 60, and (c) 90 MPa

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Fig. 8

Typical temperature, heat flux, and IHTC versus time curves of step 2

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Fig. 9

The residual error between the measured and calculated temperatures evaluated by the inverse method at position T2 = 4 mm

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Fig. 10

Local pressure and IHTC versus time curves, with the applied pressures of 30, 60, and 90 MPa for step 2 with the section thickness of 4 mm

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Fig. 11

Typical IHTC and local pressure curves for five-step casting under the applied pressure of 60 MPa

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Fig. 12

The peak IHTC values and local pressures for the casting under the applied hydraulic pressure of 60 MPa varied with the different wall thicknesses of steps 1–5

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Fig. 13

The peak IHTC values versus applied pressures for steps 1–5

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Fig. 14

IHTC derived from the inverse method data applied to magmasoft simulation for step 2

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Fig. 15

IHTC derived from the inverse method data applied to magmasoft simulation for step 5

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Fig. 16

Comparison of the experimental and computational cooling curve at the center of step 2 under an applied pressure of 60 MPa

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Fig. 17

Comparison of the experimental and computational cooling curve at the center of step 5 under an applied pressure of 60 MPa

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