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Research Papers: Heat Transfer Enhancement

Air-Side Heat Transfer Enhancement Utilizing Design Optimization and an Additive Manufacturing Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
Martinus A. Arie

Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20740
e-mail: martinus@umd.edu

Amir H. Shooshtari

Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20740
e-mail: amir@umd.edu

Veena V. Rao

Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20740
e-mail: vrao@umd.edu

Serguei V. Dessiatoun

Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20740
e-mail: ser@umd.edu

Michael M. Ohadi

Smart and Small Thermal Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20740
e-mail: ohadi@umd.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received January 18, 2016; final manuscript received October 21, 2016; published online December 28, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Danesh K. Tafti.

J. Heat Transfer 139(3), 031901 (Dec 28, 2016) (12 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1018; doi: 10.1115/1.4035068 History: Received January 18, 2016; Revised October 21, 2016

This paper focuses on the study of an innovative manifold microchannel design for air-side heat transfer enhancement that uses additive manufacturing (AM) technology. A numerical-based multi-objective optimization was performed to maximize the coefficient of performance and gravimetric heat transfer density (Q/MΔT) of air–water heat exchanger designs that incorporate either manifold-microchannel or conventional surfaces for air-side heat transfer enhancement. Performance comparisons between the manifold-microchannel and conventional heat exchangers studied under the current work show that the design based on the manifold-microchannel in conjunction with additive manufacturing promises to push the performance substantially beyond that of conventional technologies. Different scenarios based on manufacturing constraints were considered to study the effect of such constraints on the heat exchanger performance. The results clearly demonstrate that the AM-enabled complex design of the fins and manifolds can significantly improve the overall performance, based on the criteria described in this paper. Based on the current manufacturing limit, up to nearly 60% increase in gravimetric heat transfer density is possible for the manifold-microchannel heat exchanger compared to a wavy-fin heat exchanger. If the manufacturing limit (fin thickness and manifold width) can be reduced even further, an even larger improvement is possible.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Manifold-microchannel air-water heat exchanger

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Fig. 2

Conventional heat exchanger surfaces: (a) WFPFS, (b) SFPFS, (c) PPFS, (d) PFPFS, and (e) LPFS

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Fig. 3

Conventional cross flow air-water heat exchanger

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Fig. 4

Control volumes for performance evaluation of cross flow manifold-microchannel heat exchanger

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Fig. 5

Single manifold-microchannel model

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Fig. 6

SPSM model for full CFD simulation

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Fig. 7

Full CFD modeling versus hybrid and modified hybrid methods

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Fig. 8

Δp versus m˙ results of the hybrid method, modified hybrid method, and experimental results

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Fig. 9

Manifold-microchannels optimization results: the effect of fin and manifold thicknesses

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Fig. 10

Optimization results of manifold-microchannel versus conventional heat exchangers: (a) LPFS heat exchanger, (b) PPFS heat exchanger, (c) PFPFS heat exchanger, (d) WFPFS heat exchanger, and (e) SFPFS heat exchanger

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