0
Technical Brief

Effect of Chemical Reactions of H2/O2 Combustion Gas on Wall Heat Flux in a Turbulent Channel Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Tomoaki Kitano, Hiroaki Iida

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science,
Advanced Research Institute of
Fluid Science and Engineering,
Kyoto University,
Kyoto Daigaku-Katsura Katsura Campus,
C-Cluster, Nishikyo-ku,
Kyoto 615-8540, Japan

Ryoichi Kurose

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science,
Advanced Research Institute of
Fluid Science and Engineering,
Kyoto University,
Kyoto Daigaku-Katsura Katsura Campus,
C-Cluster, Nishikyo-ku,
Kyoto 615-8540, Japan
e-mail: kurose@mech.kyoto-u.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received June 1, 2016; final manuscript received November 3, 2016; published online January 10, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Milind A. Jog.

J. Heat Transfer 139(4), 044501 (Jan 10, 2017) (5 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1342; doi: 10.1115/1.4035173 History: Received June 01, 2016; Revised November 03, 2016

The effect of chemical reactions of burnt gas on heat transfer on a cooled wall in a turbulent channel flow is investigated by direct numerical simulations. Burnt gas from a H2/O2 mixture is used as a fluid and a detailed chemical reaction mechanism that considers eight chemical species and 19 elemental reactions is used in the reaction calculation. The initial gas temperature and pressure are 3173 K and 2.0 MPa, respectively. The Reynolds number based on the channel width and mean streamwise velocity is approximately 6400 and that based on the channel half width and friction velocity is approximately 200. The results show that heat release because of consumption of radicals such as OH and H near the wall increases the heat flux on the wall and that the heat flux is enhanced by the significant increase in the local heat flux at high-speed streaks where radicals are supplied by sweep events constituting bursting motions in the turbulent boundary layer.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Luo, K. , Wang, H. , Yi, F. , and Fan, J. , 2012, “ Direct Numerical Simulation Study of an Experimental Lifted H2/N2 Flame—Part 1: Validation and Flame Structure,” Energy Fuels, 26(10), pp. 6118–6127. [CrossRef]
Wang, H. , Luo, K. , Yi, F. , and Fan, J. , 2012, “ Direct Numerical Simulation Study of an Experimental Lifted H2/N2 Flame—Part 2: Flame Stabilization,” Energy Fuels, 26(8), pp. 4830–4839. [CrossRef]
Wang, H. , Luo, K. , and Fan, J. , 2012, “ Direct Numerical Simulation and Conditional Statistics of Hydrogen/Air Turbulent Premixed Flames,” Energy Fuels, 27(1), pp. 549–560. [CrossRef]
Ahmed, I. , and Swaminathan, N. , 2014, “ Simulation of Turbulent Explosion of Hydrogen–Air Mixtures,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 39(17), pp. 9562–9572. [CrossRef]
Minamoto, Y. , Aoki, K. , Tanahashi, M. , and Swaminathan, N. , 2015, “ DNS of Swirling Hydrogen–Air Premixed Flames,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40(39), pp. 13604–13620. [CrossRef]
Kawamura, H. , Ohsaka, K. , Abe, H. , and Yamamoto, K. , 1998, “ DNS of Turbulent Heat Transfer in Channel Flow With Low to Medium-High Prandtl Number Fluid,” Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 19(5), pp. 482–491. [CrossRef]
Morinishi, Y. , Tamano, S. , and Nakabayashi, K. , 2004, “ Direct Numerical Simulation of Compressible Turbulent Channel Flow Between Adiabatic and Isothermal Walls,” J. Fluid Mech., 502, pp. 273–308. [CrossRef]
Scalo, C. , Bodart, J. , and Lele, S. K. , 2015, “ Compressible Turbulent Channel Flow With Impedance Boundary Conditions,” Phys. Fluids, 27(3), p. 035107. [CrossRef]
Eichler, C. , Baumgartner, G. , and Sattelmayer, T. , 2012, “ Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flashback Limits for Premixed Hydrogen-Air Flames Confined in Ducts,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 134(1), p. 011502. [CrossRef]
Gruber, A. , Sankaran, R. , Hawkes, E. , and Chen, J. , 2010, “ Turbulent Flame–Wall Interaction: A Direct Numerical Simulation Study,” J. Fluid Mech., 658, pp. 5–32. [CrossRef]
Gruber, A. , Chen, J. H. , Valiev, D. , and Law, C. K. , 2012, “ Direct Numerical Simulation of Premixed Flame Boundary Layer Flashback in Turbulent Channel Flow,” J. Fluid Mech., 709, pp. 516–542. [CrossRef]
Lee, Y. , Korpela, S. A. , and Horne, R. N. , 1982, “ Structure of Multi-Cellular Natural Convection in a Tall Vertical Annulus,” 7th International Heat Transfer Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 221–226.
Mayer, C. , Sangl, J. , Sattelmayer, T. , Lachaux, T. , and Bernero, S. , 2012, “ Study on the Operational Window of a Swirl Stabilized Syngas Burner Under Atmospheric and High Pressure Conditions,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power, 134(3), p. 031506. [CrossRef]
Conaire, M. Ó. , Curran, H. J. , Simmie, J. M. , Pitz, W. J. , and Westbrook, C. K. , 2004, “ A Comprehensive Modeling Study of Hydrogen Oxidation,” Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 36(11), pp. 603–622. [CrossRef]
Liu, X.-D. , Osher, S. , and Chan, T. , 1994, “ Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes,” J. Comput. Phys., 115(1), pp. 200–212. [CrossRef]
Baba, Y. , and Kurose, R. , 2008, “ Analysis and Flamelet Modelling for Spray Combustion,” J. Fluid Mech., 612, pp. 45–79. [CrossRef]
Fujita, A. , Watanabe, H. , Kurose, R. , and Komori, S. , 2013, “ Two-Dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation of Spray Flames–Part 1: Effects of Equivalence Ratio, Fuel Droplet Size and Radiation, and Validity of Flamelet Model,” Fuel, 104, pp. 515–525. [CrossRef]
Kitano, T. , Nakatani, T. , Kurose, R. , and Komori, S. , 2013, “ Two-Dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation of Spray Flames–Part 2: Effects of Ambient Pressure and Lift, and Validity of Flamelet Model,” Fuel, 104, pp. 526–535. [CrossRef]
Brown, P. N. , Byrne, G. D. , and Hindmarsh, A. C. , 1989, “ VODE: A Variable-Coefficient ODE Solver,” SIAM J. Sci. Stat. Comput., 10(5), pp. 1038–1051. [CrossRef]
Kitano, T. , Tsuji, T. , Kurose, R. , and Komori, S. , 2015, “ Effect of Pressure Oscillations on Flashback Characteristics in a Turbulent Channel Flow,” Energy Fuels, 29(10), pp. 6815–6822. [CrossRef]
Hara, T. , Muto, M. , Kitano, T. , Kurose, R. , and Komori, S. , 2015, “ Direct Numerical Simulation of a Pulverized Coal Jet Flame Employing a Global Volatile Matter Reaction Scheme Based on Detailed Reaction Mechanism,” Combust. Flame, 162(12), pp. 4391–4407. [CrossRef]
Kitano, T. , Nishio, J. , Kurose, R. , and Komori, S. , 2014, “ Effects of Ambient Pressure, Gas Temperature and Combustion Reaction on Droplet Evaporation,” Combust. Flame, 161(2), pp. 551–564. [CrossRef]
Kitano, T. , Nishio, J. , Kurose, R. , and Komori, S. , 2014, “ Evaporation and Combustion of Multicomponent Fuel Droplets,” Fuel, 136, pp. 219–225. [CrossRef]
Kitano, T. , Kurose, R. , and Komori, S. , 2013, “ Effects of Internal Pressure and Inlet Velocity Disturbances of Air and Fuel Droplets on Spray Combustion Field,” J. Therm. Sci. Technol., 8(1), pp. 269–280. [CrossRef]
Moser, R. D. , Kim, J. , and Mansour, N. N. , 1999, “ Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Channel Flow Up to Re = 590,” Phys. Fluids, 11(4), pp. 943–945. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Computational domain and conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Instantaneous isosurface of secondary invariant of velocity gradient tensor and instantaneous distribution of streamwise velocity, u, on the x–z plain at y+ ≃ 4 for the case with chemical reactions in the cooling region

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Streamwise distributions of time- and spanwise-averaged wall heat flux, q¯wall, for the cases with and without chemical reactions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Streamwise distributions of increased rates of time- and spanwise-averaged temperature gradient, Δ(dT/dy)¯wall, heat conductivity, Δλ¯wall, and wall heat flux, Δq¯wall

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Vertical distributions of time- and spanwise-averaged mass fractions of chemical species k, Y¯k (k denotes H2O, OH, O2, H2, and H), and heat release rate, Q¯, at x+ ≃ 900 for the case with chemical reactions

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Instantaneous distributions of streamwise velocity, u, on the x–z plain at y+ ≃ 4, and instantaneous distributions of wall heat flux, qwall, on the x–z plain for the cases with and without chemical reactions. (Dashed lines indicate positions of low-speed streaks.): (a) with chemical reactions and (b) without chemical reactions.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Scatter diagrams of instantaneous streamwise velocity, u, on the x–z plain at y+ ≃ 4 versus instantaneous wall heat flux, qwall, for the cases with and without chemical reactions, and heat release rate, Q, on the x–z plain at y+ ≃ 4 for the case with chemical reactions. (Dashed and solid lines are regression lines for the cases with and without chemical reactions, respectively.): (a) qwall and (b) Q.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Instantaneous distributions of mass fraction of OH, YOH, reaction rate of OH, ω˙OH, heat release rate, Q, and temperature, T, on the x–z plain at y+ ≃ 4 for the case with chemical reactions. (Dashed line indicates a position of x+ ≃ 900.)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Instantaneous distributions of streamwise velocity, u, mass fraction of OH, YOH, reaction rate of OH, ω˙OH, heat release rate, Q, and temperature, T, on the y–z plain at x+ ≃ 900 for the case with chemical reactions. (Small arrows represent velocity vectors, and bottom arrows indicate positions of low-speed streaks.)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In