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Research Papers: Combustion and Reactive Flows

Numerical Study of Inlet Turbulators Effect on the Thermal Characteristics of a Jet Propulsion-Fueled Combustor and Its Hazardous Pollutants Emission

[+] Author and Article Information
Masoud Darbandi

Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Center of Excellence in Aerospace Systems,
Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology,
Sharif University of Technology,
P. O. Box 11365-8639,
Tehran 14588-89694, Iran
e-mail: darbandi@sharif.edu

Majid Ghafourizadeh

Department of Aerospace Engineering,
Center of Excellence in Aerospace Systems,
Sharif University of Technology,
P. O. Box 11365-8639,
Tehran 14588-89694, Iran

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received June 10, 2016; final manuscript received December 6, 2016; published online February 28, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Zhuomin Zhang.

J. Heat Transfer 139(6), 061201 (Feb 28, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1375; doi: 10.1115/1.4035443 History: Received June 10, 2016; Revised December 06, 2016

This work numerically studies the effects of inlet air and fuel turbulators on the thermal behavior of a combustor burning the jet propulsion (JP) (kerosene-surrogate) fuel and its resulting pollutants emission including the nanoparticulate soot aerosols and aromatic compounds. To model the soot formation, the method employs a semi-empirical two-equation model, in which the transport equations for soot mass fraction and soot number density are solved considering soot nanoparticles evolutionary process. The soot nucleation is described using the phenyl route in which the soot is formed from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Incorporating a detailed chemical mechanism described by 200 species and 6907 elementary reactions, the flamelets and their lookup table library are precomputed and used in the context of steady laminar flamelet model (SLFM). Thus, the current finite-volume method solves the transport equations for the mean mixture fraction and its variance and considers the chemistry–turbulence interaction using the presumed-shape probability density functions (PDFs). To validate the utilized models, a benchmark combustor is first simulated, and the results are compared with the measurements. Second, the numerical method is used to investigate the effects of embedding different inflow turbulators on the resulting flame structure and the combustor pollutants emission. The chosen turbulators produce mild to severe turbulence intensity (TI) effects at the air and fuel inlets. Generally, the results of current study indicate that the use of suitable turbulators can considerably affect the thermal behavior of a JP-fueled combustor. Additionally, it also reduces the combustor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollutants emission.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The geometry of current combustor [51]

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Fig. 2

Four typical neighboring elements are broken into 16 subquadrilaterals to construct one full finite volume

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Fig. 3

The effects of mesh refinements (a) and turbulence model choices (b) on a number of parameter distributions along the flame centerline and comparisons with the experimental data of Young et al. [51] and numerical results of Wen et al. [27]

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Fig. 4

Contours of turbulence intensity (TI) and temperature (T) inside the combustor embedded with weak (3%) (bottom-half) and strong (20%) (top-half) inlet turbulator influences

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Fig. 5

The temperature (left) and soot volume fraction (right) variations along the combustor centerline using various turbulator influences at the inlets of combustor

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Fig. 6

Contours of soot volume fraction (SVF) and soot particle diameter inside the combustor embedded with weak (3%) (bottom-half) and strong (20%) (top-half) inlet turbulator influences

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Fig. 7

Contours of different aromatic compound mass fractions inside the combustor embedded with weak (3%) (bottom-half) and strong (20%) (top-half) inlet turbulator influences

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Fig. 8

The mass fraction distributions of aromatic compounds along the combustor centerline using various turbulator influences at the inlets of combustor

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Fig. 9

The effects of embedding inlet turbulators with various turbulence influences on the temperature variation along the combustor wall

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