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Research Papers: Heat and Mass Transfer

Experimental Investigation on Heat Transfer Performance of a Flat Plate Heat Pipe With MWCNTS-Acetone Nanofluid

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaohong Hao

School of Mechatronics,
University of Electronic Science and
Technology of China,
Chengdu 611731, Sichuan, China;
State Key Laboratory for
Manufacturing Systems Engineering,
Xi’an 710054, Shaanxi, China
e-mail: haoxiaohong@uestc.edu.cn

Bei Peng

School of Mechatronics,
University of Electronic Science and
Technology of China,
Chengdu 611731, Sichuan, China;
Center for Robotics,
University of Electronic Science and
Technology of China,
Chengdu 611731, Sichuan, China

Yi Chen

School of Engineering and Built Environment,
Glasgow Caledonian University,
Glasgow G4 0BA, UK

Gongnan Xie

Department of Mechanical and
Power Engineering,
School of Marine Science and Technology,
Northwestern Polytechnical University,
Xi’an 710072, China
e-mail: xgn@nwpu.edu.cn

1 Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received July 8, 2016; final manuscript received December 5, 2016; published online February 28, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Ronggui Yang.

J. Heat Transfer 139(6), 062001 (Feb 28, 2017) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1448; doi: 10.1115/1.4035446 History: Received July 08, 2016; Revised December 05, 2016

This paper experimentally investigates how different mass concentration and aspect ratio multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) acetone nanofluid affects the heat transfer performance of a flat plate heat pipe (FPHP). Different mass concentration and aspect ratio MWCNTs-acetone nanofluids are prepared without any surfactants or additives using the two-step method. Aspect ratios of MWCNTs are 666 (M1) and 200 (M2), respectively, and their according mass concentrations are 0.002, 0.005, 0.01, and 0.015 wt. %, respectively. The thermal resistance and wall temperature of the FPHP are experimentally obtained when the above-mentioned nanofluids are used as working fluid. The results showed that different mass concentration affects the heat transfer performance, therefore, there is an optimal MWCNTs-acetone nanofluid mass concentration (about 0.005wt. %). Also, the results showed that the thermal resistances of the FPHP with M1-acetone nanofluid (0.005 wt. %) and M2-acetone nanofluid (0.005 wt. %) are reduced 40% and 16%, respectively. Based on the above experimental phenomenon, this paper discusses the reasons for enhancement and decrement of heat transfer performance of the different mass concentration. For the M1-acetone nanofluid, the investigated FPHP has a thermal resistance of 0.26 °C/W and effective thermal conductivity 3212 W/m k at a heat input of 160 W. For the M2-acetone nanofluid, the investigated FPHP has a thermal resistance of 0.33 °C/W and effective thermal conductivity 2556 W/m k at a heat input of 150 W. The nanofluid FPHP investigated here provides a new approach in designing a high efficient next generation heat pipe cooling devices.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

MWCNTs-acetone nanofluid samples:M1-acetone nanofluid samples (0.002 wt. %, 0.005 wt. %, 0.01 wt. %, and 0.015 wt. %)

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Fig. 2

M1-acetone nanofluid samples (0.015 wt. %): (a) 1 day and (b) 40 day

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Fig. 3

Schematic of the FPHP: (a) the structure of the FPHP, (b) the structure of the Rib, and (c) the inner structure of the FPHP

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Fig. 4

Experimental system: (a) schematic of experimental system, (b) experimental system setup, and (c) experimental part: 1, computer; 2, data acquisition; 3, DC power supply; 4, multimeter; 5, experimental part; 6, bath; 7, peristaltic pump 8, heat source; 9, FPHP; 10, temperature sensor, 11, cold plate

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Fig. 5

The schematic diagram of the thermocouples position

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Fig. 6

Effect of Q on thermal resistance with different liquid filling ratio

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Fig. 7

Effect of Q on Rth and Keff with different mass concentration (M1-acetone): (a) Rth and (b) Keff

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Fig. 8

Effect of Q on Rth and Keff with different mass concentration (M2-acetone): (a) Rth and (b) Keff

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Fig. 9

The wall temperature distribution of the FPHP along the axial length: (a) 60 W and (b) 120 W

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Fig. 10

Nanofluids before and after experiment (0.005 wt. % M1-acetone nanofluid): (a) before experiment and (b) after experiment

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Fig. 11

Optical microscope picture (0.005 wt. % M1-acetone nanofluid): (a) before experiment and (b) after experiment

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Fig. 12

Thermal resistance of FPHP

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Fig. 13

The variations of the ratio of the effective thermal conductivity enhancement

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