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Effect of Dual Frequency Ultrasound on the Bubble Formation in a Capillary Tube

[+] Author and Article Information
Benwei Fu

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science Dalian Maritime University,Dalian, China
845744877@qq.com

Nannan Zhao

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science Dalian Maritime University,Dalian, China
7703090@qq.com

Guoyou Wang

Institute of Marine Engineering and Thermal Science Dalian Maritime University,Dalian, China
wangguoyou163@163.com

Hongbin Ma

Department of Electrical and computer engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA
mah@missouri.edu

1Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 139(2), 020907 (Jan 06, 2017) Paper No: HT-16-1719; doi: 10.1115/1.4035577 History: Received November 04, 2016; Revised November 29, 2016

Abstract

A visual experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of dual frequency ultrasound on the bubble formation and growth in a capillary quartz tube. Two piezoelectric ceramics were used in this experiment. They were made of Pb-based lanthanum-doped zirconate titanates (PLZTs). The PLZTs were placed on a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm and an outer diameter of 3 mm. The capillary tube was vacuumed first and then charged with water using a filling ratio of 70%. The ultrasonic sound was applied to the heating section of a capillary tube. The bubble formation and growth were recorded by a high speed camera. As shown in figures, when the ultrasound with a single frequency of either 154 kHz or 474 kHz was applied, only one bubble was generated. When the dual frequencies of 154 kHz and 474 kHz were applied, more bubbles were generated. The speed of the bubble growth with dual frequency ultrasound was much higher than that with a single frequency. When a dual frequency ultrasound (154 kHz and 474 kHz) was used, the nucleation sites for bubble formation were significantly increased and the bubble growth rate enhanced.

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