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Technical Brief

Investigation of the Influence of Elevated Pressure on Subcooled Boiling Flow—Model Evaluation Toward Generic Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
Sara Vahaji

School of Aerospace,
Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (SAMME),
RMIT University,
Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
e-mail: Sara.vahaji@rmit.edu.au

Sherman Chi Pok Cheung

School of Aerospace,
Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (SAMME),
RMIT University,
Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
e-mail: Chipok.cheung@rmit.edu.au

Guan Heng Yeoh

School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering,
University of New South Wales, ANSTO,
Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
e-mail: g.yeoh@unsw.edu.au

Jiyuan Tu

Professor
School of Aerospace, Mechanical and
Manufacturing Engineering (SAMME),
RMIT University,
Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
e-mail: Jiyuan.tu@rmit.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received March 28, 2016; final manuscript received December 12, 2016; published online March 15, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Debjyoti Banerjee.

J. Heat Transfer 139(7), 074501 (Mar 15, 2017) (10 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1155; doi: 10.1115/1.4035805 History: Received March 28, 2016; Revised December 12, 2016

Modeling subcooled boiling flows in vertical channels has relied heavily on the utilization of empirical correlations for the active nucleation site density, bubble departure diameter, and bubble departure frequency. Following the development and application of mechanistic modeling at low pressures, the capability of the model to resolve flow conditions at elevated pressure up to 10 bar is thoroughly assessed and compared with selected empirical models. Predictions of the mechanistic and selected empirical models are validated against two experimental data at low to elevated pressures. The results demonstrate that the mechanistic model is capable of predicting the heat and mass transfer processes. In spite of some drawbacks of the currently adopted force balance model, the results still point to the great potential of the mechanistic model to predict a wide range of flow conditions in subcooled boiling flows.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

A schematic illustration of test channels: (a) elevated pressure cases [5] and (b) low pressure case [32,33]

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Fig. 2

Predicted radial distribution of void fraction and experimental data for (a) case P143, (b) case P218, (c) case P497, and (d) case P949

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Fig. 3

Predicted radial distribution of mean Sauter bubble diameter and experimental data for (a) case P143, (b) case P218, (c) case P497, and (d) case P949

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Fig. 4

Predicted radial distribution of interfacial area concentration (IAC) and experimental data for (a) case P143, (b) case P218, (c) case P497, and (d) case P949

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Fig. 5

(a) Predicted void fraction versus measured void fraction and (b) predicted IAC vs. measured IAC

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Fig. 6

The mechanistic predictions for cases P143–P949 of (a) bubble liftoff diameter, (c) wall superheat temperature, (e) active nucleation site density, (g) the contribution of evaporation heat in heat partitioning model, and the empirical predictions for cases P143–P949 of (b) bubble liftoff diameter, (d) wall superheat temperature, (f) active nucleation site density, and (h) the contribution of evaporation heat in heat partitioning model

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Fig. 7

The mechanistic predictions for P143–P949 kPa at flow condition of 238 kW/m2 wall heat flux, 12.7 °C subcooling temperature, and 1.96 m/s inlet velocity of (a) bubble liftoff diameter, (b) bubble growth time, and (c) bubble departure frequency

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