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Similarity criteria for modelling mixed-convection heat transfer in ducted flows of supercritical fluids

[+] Author and Article Information
Chukwudi Azih

Carleton University Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6
chukwudi.azih@gmail.com

Metin I. Yaras

Carleton University Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6
metin_yaras@carleton.ca

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036689 History: Received September 09, 2016; Revised March 18, 2017

Abstract

A key subject of interest for technologies that involve flows of fluids at the supercritical thermodynamic state is the development of prediction methods that capture the fluid dynamics and convection heat transfer at this state. Due to the elevated temperatures and pressures associated with certain working fluids at this thermodynamic state, surrogate fluids are often used as substitutes for performing experiments during the design stages of prototype development. The success of this approach depends on the development of similarity criteria or fluid-to-fluid models. Similarity criteria for mixed-convection heat transfer in supercritical fluids are proposed based on a set of non-dimensional dynamic similarity parameters and state-space parameters developed through our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that affect heat transfer in fluids at this state. The proposed similarity criteria are successfully validated using data from ducted flows of supercritical fluids with configurations having upstream, downstream, or wall-normal oriented gravitational acceleration.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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