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Research Papers: Heat and Mass Transfer

An Ultrafast Vitrification Method for Cell Cryopreservation

[+] Author and Article Information
Fengmin Su

Marine Engineering College,
Dalian Maritime University,
1#, Linhai Road,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: fengminsu@dlmu.edu.cn

Nannan Zhao

Marine Engineering College,
Dalian Maritime University,
1#, Linhai Road,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: znn@dlmu.edu.cn

Yangbo Deng

Marine Engineering College,
Dalian Maritime University,
1#, Linhai Road,
Dalian 116026, China
e-mail: dengyb1970@163.com

Hongbin Ma

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri—Columbia,
E3407 Lafferre Hall,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: mah@missouri.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received March 17, 2016; final manuscript received May 23, 2017; published online August 16, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Chun Yang.

J. Heat Transfer 140(1), 012001 (Aug 16, 2017) (4 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1142; doi: 10.1115/1.4037327 History: Received March 17, 2016; Revised May 23, 2017

Ultrafast cooling is the key to successful cell vitrification cryopreservation of lower concentration cryoprotective solution. This research develops a cell cryopreservation methodology which utilizes thin film evaporation and achieves vitrification of relatively low concentration cryoprotectant with an ultrafast cooling rate. Experimental results show that the average cooling rate of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) cryoprotective solution reaches 150,000 °C/min in a temperature range from 10 °C to −180 °C. The ultrafast cooling rate can remarkably improve the vitrification tendencies of the cryoprotective solution. This methodology opens the possibility for more successful cell vitrification cryopreservation.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of “vapor blanket” formation during the cooling process of OPS method

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Fig. 2

Schematic of experimental setup: 1—vessel, 2—thin film evaporator, 3—pressure sensor, 4—vacuum pump, 5—liquid nitrogen vessels with valve, 6—thermocouple, 7—needle, and 8—DAQ system

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Fig. 3

Microstructured sample for thin film evaporation (a) schematic; (b) 3D photo of surface (using 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy, Olympus Corporation); and (c) cross-sectional view of microstructured layer (using Micro-CT, Xradia Inc.)

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Fig. 4

Temperature histories of pure water by (a) pool boiling (the test section was directly plunged in liquid nitrogen) and (b) thin film evaporation

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Fig. 5

Temperature histories of 10 wt % DMSO solution by (a) pool boiling (the test section was directly plunged in liquid nitrogen) and (b) thin film evaporation

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Fig. 6

Temperature histories of 20 wt % DMSO solution by (a) pool boiling (the test section was directly plunged in liquid nitrogen) and (b) thin film evaporation

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Fig. 7

Temperature histories of 30 wt % DMSO solution by (a) pool boiling (the test section was directly plunged in liquid nitrogen) and (b) thin film evaporation

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