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Research Papers: Forced Convection

Numerical Simulation of Flow and Heat Transfer in Rotating Cooling Passage With Turning Vane in Hub Region

[+] Author and Article Information
Hung-Chieh Chu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
3123 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843-3123
e-mail: chu575@tamu.edu

Hamn-Ching Chen

Zachry Department of Civil Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
3136 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843-3136
e-mail: hcchen@civil.tamu.edu

Je-Chin Han

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Texas A&M University,
3123 TAMU,
College Station, TX 77843-3123
e-mail: jc-han@tamu.edu

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received December 21, 2016; final manuscript received June 6, 2017; published online August 29, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Danesh K. Tafti.

J. Heat Transfer 140(2), 021701 (Aug 29, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1821; doi: 10.1115/1.4037498 History: Received December 21, 2016; Revised June 06, 2017

Numerical simulation of three-dimensional turbulent flow and heat transfer was performed in a multipass rectangular (AR = 2:1) rotating cooling channel with and without turning vane in the hub region under various flow conditions, with two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 25,000, two different channel orientations of 45-deg and 90-deg, and the rotation number varies from 0 to 0.2. This study shows that the addition of the turning vane in the hub turn region does not cause much impact to the flow before the hub. However, it significantly alters the flow reattachment and vortex distribution in the hub turn region and after the hub turn portion. The local heat transfer is deeply influenced by this complex flow field and this turning vane effect lasts from the hub turn region to the portion after it.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry, numerical grid, and conceptual view of rotating rectangular channel (AR = 2:1)

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Fig. 2

Grid refinement study

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Fig. 3

Spanwise-averaged Nusselt number ratio on the leading surface obtained from the three different sources (Re = 10,000): (a) case 3: Ro = 0.0, Δρ/ρ = 0.22, without vane, (b) case 5: Ro = 0.2, Δρ/ρ = 0.22, without vane, (c) case 7: Ro = 0.0, Δρ/ρ = 0.22, with vane, and (d) case 9: Ro = 0.0, Δρ/ρ = 0.22, with vane

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Fig. 4

Velocity vectors and dimensionless temperature contour at the middle plane of rectangular channel (Re = 25,000, Ro = 0.0, and 0.2, Δρ/ρ = 0.22; cases 3, 5, 7, and 9)

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Fig. 5

Secondary flow for nonrotating channel (cases 3 and 7)

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Fig. 6

Secondary flow for rotating channel (cases 5 and 9)

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Fig. 7

Effect of vane on pressure distribution (cases 3, 5, 7, and 9)

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Fig. 8

Nusselt number ratio contours on (a) leading surface and (b) trailing surface of channels with and without turning vane; Re = 25,000, Δρ/ρ = 0.22

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Fig. 9

Nusselt number ratio contours on sides 1 and 2 of channels with and without turning vane and temperature contours on the vane surface; Re = 25,000, Δρ/ρ = 0.22: (a) case 3, (b) case 7, (c) case 5, and (d) case 9

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Fig. 10

Effect of vane on spanwise-averaged Nusselt number ratio for nonrotating channels (cases 3 and 7)

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Fig. 11

Effect of vane on spanwise-averaged Nusselt number ratio for rotating channels with Ro = 0.1 (cases 4 and 8)

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Fig. 12

Effect of vane on spanwise-averaged Nusselt number ratio on sides 1 and 2 of rotating channels with different channel orientations

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