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Research Papers: Jets, Wakes, and Impingment Cooling

Experimental Study on Combined Cooling Method for Porous Struts in Supersonic Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Gan Huang

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and
Power Engineering of Ministry of Education,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 10084, China
e-mail: huangg13@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn

Yinhai Zhu

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and
Power Engineering of Ministry of Education,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 10084, China
e-mail: yinhai.zhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

Zhiyuan Liao

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and
Power Engineering of Ministry of Education,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 10084, China
e-mail: lzy1313131@163.com

Taojie Lu

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and
Power Engineering of Ministry of Education,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 10084, China
e-mail: 822865666@qq.com

Pei-Xue Jiang

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and
Power Engineering of Ministry of Education,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 10084, China
e-mail: jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn

Zheng Huang

China State Shipbuilding Corporation,
Haidian district,
Beijing 10084, China
e-mail: huangz10@cssc.net.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received January 13, 2017; final manuscript received June 12, 2017; published online September 6, 2017. Assoc. Editor: George S. Dulikravich.

J. Heat Transfer 140(2), 022201 (Sep 06, 2017) (12 pages) Paper No: HT-17-1019; doi: 10.1115/1.4037499 History: Received January 13, 2017; Revised June 12, 2017

A combined transpiration and opposing jet cooling method was experimentally investigated for protecting porous struts with microslits in the leading edge. Schlieren images showed that this cooling method significantly affects the stability of the flow field and the profile of the detached shock wave. Three different states of flow fields were observed when increasing the coolant injection pressure of a strut having a 0.20 mm wide microslit. The detached bow shock was pushed away by the opposing jet; it then became unstable and even disappeared when the coolant injection pressure was increased. Combined transpiration and opposing jet cooling could effectively cool the entire strut, especially the leading edge. The leading edge cooling efficiency increased from 3.5% for the leading edge without a slit to 52.8% for the leading edge with a 0.20 mm wide slit when the coolant injection pressure was 0.55 MPa. Moreover, combined transpiration and opposing jet cooling with nonuniform injection distribution made the strut temperature distribution more uniform and caused the maximum temperature to decrease compared to standard transpiration cooling.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the strut with a microslit in the leading edge

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Fig. 3

Sintered stainless steel porous struts

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Fig. 4

Slit widths measured using a microscope

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Fig. 5

Strut welded with two metal coolant pipes

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Fig. 6

Test section for heat transfer investigation (3/4 sectional view)

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Fig. 7

Test section for flow field measurement

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Fig. 8

Thermocouple distribution

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Fig. 9

Shock wave distributions for different microslit widths and coolant injection pressures

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Fig. 10

Comparison of detached shock wave under coolant injection pressures of 0.10 MPa (upper half) and 0.35 MPa (bottom half) for the strut with a 0.12 mm wide microslit

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Fig. 11

State changes of the flow field with increasing coolant injection pressure for struts with 0.20 mm wide slit

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Fig. 12

Temperature distributions on struts for different slit widths and coolant injection pressures

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Fig. 13

Temperature and cooling efficiency distributions along the middle of the struts surfaces for different slit widths and coolant injection pressures: (a) temperature distributions and (b) cooling efficiency distributions

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Fig. 14

Temperature and cooling efficiency on the strut leading edges for different slit widths and coolant injection pressures: (a) leading edge temperature and (b) leading edge cooling efficiencies

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Fig. 15

Temperature and cooling efficiency distribution along the middle of the strut surfaces for the same coolant consumption with uniform injection pressure: (a) temperature distributions and (b) cooling efficiency distributions

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Fig. 16

Temperature distributions on the struts with nonuniform coolant injection rates for a constant coolant mass flow rate of M = 0.851 g/s (F = 0.19%)

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Fig. 17

Temperature and cooling efficiency distribution on the strut with a 0.12 mm wide microslit under nonuniform coolant injection rates and a constant coolant mass flow rate of M = 0.851 g/s (F = 0.19%): (a) temperature distributions and (b) cooling efficiency distributions

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Fig. 18

Temperature and cooling efficiency distributions on the strut with a 0.20 mm wide microslit under nonuniform coolant injection rates and a constant total coolant mass flow rate M = 0.851 g/s (F = 0.19%): (a) temperature distributions and (b) cooling efficiency distributions

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