0
research-article

Experimental investigation of jet impingement cooling with carbon dioxide at supercritical pressures

[+] Author and Article Information
Kai Chen

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology of Beijing, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
chenk14@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn

Rui-Na Xu

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology of Beijing, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
ruinaxu@tsinghua.edu.cn

Peixue Jiang

Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology of Beijing, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038421 History: Received April 27, 2017; Revised September 03, 2017

Abstract

In this study, the flow field and the local and average heat transfer characteristics of jet impingement cooling with supercritical pressure fluids were studied experimentally with carbon dioxide firstly. An integrated thermal sensor chip that provided heating and temperature measurements was manufactured using MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) techniques with a low thermal conductivity substrate as the impingement cooled plate. The experiment system pressure was 7.85 MPa, which is higher than the critical pressure of carbon dioxide of 7.38 MPa. The mass flow rate ranged from 8.34 to 22.36 kg/h and the Reynolds number ranged from 19000 to 68000. The heat flux ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 MW/m2. The nozzle inlet temperature ranged from lower to higher than the pseudocritical temperature. Dramatic variations of the density at supercritical pressures near the heating chip were observed with increasing heat flux in the strong reflection and refraction of the backlight that disappeared at inlet temperatures higher than the pseudocritical temperature. The local heat transfer coefficient near the stagnation point increased with increasing heat flux while those far from the stagnation point increased to a maximum with increasing heat flux and then decreased due to the non-uniformity of jet impingement cooling. The heat transfer is higher at inlet temperatures lower than the pseudocritical temperature and the surface temperature is slightly higher than the pseudocritical temperature due to the dramatic changes in the fluid thermo-physical properties at supercritical pressures.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In