0
research-article

Use of detailed particle melt modeling to calculate effective melt properties for powders

[+] Author and Article Information
Daniel Moser

Department of Mechanical, Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 204 E. Dean Keeton St, Stop C2200, ETC II 5.160, Austin, TX 78712
danrmoser@utexas.edu

Anil Yuksel

Department of Mechanical, Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 204 E. Dean Keeton St, Stop C2200, ETC II 5.160, Austin, TX 78712
anil.yuksel@utexas.edu

Michael Cullinan

Department of Mechanical, Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 204 E. Dean Keeton St, Stop C2200, ETC II 5.160, Austin, TX 78712
michael.cullinan@austin.utexas.edu

Jayathi Murthy

Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, 7400 Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095
jmurthy@ucla.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038423 History: Received May 10, 2017; Revised August 31, 2017

Abstract

Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a widely used powder-based additive manufacturing process. However, it can be difficult to predict how process inputs affect the quality of parts produced. Computational modeling has been used to address some of these difficulties, but a challenge has been accurately capturing the behavior of the powder in a large, bed-scale model. In this work, a multi-scale melting model is implemented to simulate the melting of powder particles for SLM. The approach employs a particle-scale model for powder melting to develop a melt fraction-temperature relationship for use in bed-scale simulations of SLM. Additionally, uncertainties from the particle-scale are propagated through the relationship to the bed scale, thus allowing particle-scale uncertainties to be included in the bed-scale uncertainty estimation. Relations, with uncertainty, are developed for the average melt fraction of the powder as a function of the average temperature of the powder. The utility of these melt fraction-temperature relations is established by using them to model phase change using a continuum bed-scale model of the SLM process. It is shown that the use of the developed relations captures partial melt behavior of the powder that a simple melting model cannot. Furthermore, the model accounts for both uncertainty in material properties as well as packing structure in the final melt fraction-temperature relationship, unlike simple melting models. The developed melt fraction-temperature relations may be used for bed-scale SLM simulations with uncertainty due to particle effects.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In