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Technical Brief

Experimental Validation of a Boundary Layer Convective Heat Flux Measurement Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
K. S. Kulkarni

Heat Transfer Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Minnesota,
111 Church Street SE,
Minneapolis, MN 55455

U. Madanan

Heat Transfer Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Minnesota,
111 Church Street SE,
Minneapolis, MN 55455
e-mail: madan016@umn.edu

T. W. Simon

Turbulent Convective Heat Transfer Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Minnesota,
111 Church Street SE,
Minneapolis, MN 55455

R. J. Goldstein

Heat Transfer Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Minnesota,
111 Church Street SE,
Minneapolis, MN 55455

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 9, 2017; final manuscript received November 16, 2017; published online March 27, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Yuwen Zhang.

J. Heat Transfer 140(7), 074501 (Mar 27, 2018) (5 pages) Paper No: HT-17-1260; doi: 10.1115/1.4038790 History: Received May 09, 2017; Revised November 16, 2017

If a steady thermal boundary layer is sufficiently thick, wall heat fluxes and associated convective heat transfer coefficients can be directly calculated from measured temperature distributions taken within it using a traversing thermocouple probe. The boundary layer can be laminar, turbulent, or transitional and on a surface of arbitrary surface temperature distribution and geometry. Herein, this technique is presented and validated in a steady, turbulent, two-dimensional boundary layer on a flat, uniform-heat-flux wall. Care is taken to properly account for radiation from the wall and conduction within the thermocouple wire. In the same setting, heat flux measurements are made for verification purposes using an energy balance on a segment of the test wall carefully designed to minimize and include radiation and conduction effects. Heat flux values measured by the boundary layer measurement technique and by the energy balance measurement agree to within 4.4% and the difference between the two lie completely within their respective measurement uncertainties of 5.74% and 0.6%.

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References

Blackwell, B. F. , and Moffat, R. J. , 1975, “ Design and Construction of a Low Velocity Boundary Temperature Probe,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 97(2), pp. 313–315. [CrossRef]
Qiu, S. , Simon, T. W. , and Volino, R. J. , 1995, “ Evaluation of Local Wall Temperature, Heat Flux and Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient From the Near-Wall Temperature Profile, ‘Heat Transfer in Turbulent Flows’,” Heat Transfer Division, ASME, New York, Vol. 318, pp. 45–52.
Kulkarni, K. S. , Han, S. , and Goldstein, R. J. , 2011, “ Numerical Simulation of Thermal Boundary Layer Profile Measurement,” Heat Mass Transfer, 47(8), pp. 869–877. [CrossRef]
Han, S. , and Goldstein, R. J. , 2007, “ Heat Transfer Study in a Linear Turbine Cascade Using a Thermal Boundary Layer Measurement Technique,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 129(10), pp. 1384–1394. [CrossRef]
Kulkarni, K. S. , Madanan, U. , Mittal, R. , and Goldstein, R. J. , 2017, “ Experimental Validation of Heat/Mass Transfer Analogy for Two-Dimensional Laminar and Turbulent Boundary Layers,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 113, pp. 84–95. [CrossRef]
Mittal, R. , Madanan, U. , and Goldstein, R. J. , 2017, “ The Heat/Mass Transfer Analogy for a Backward Facing Step,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 113, pp. 411–422. [CrossRef]
Clauser, F. H. , 1954, “ Turbulent Boundary Layers in Adverse Pressure Gradients,” J. Aerosp. Sci., 21(2), pp. 91–108.
Schlichting, H. , and Gersten, K. , 2000, Boundary-Layer Theory, 8th ed., Springer-Verlag, Berlin. [CrossRef] [PubMed] [PubMed]

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of thermocouple probe: (a) front view and (b) side view

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Fig. 2

Design and construction details of constant heat flux plate (flow is from left to right)

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Fig. 3

Design and construction details of Steel Shim and Balsa Wood Assembly (flow is from left to right)

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Fig. 4

Schematic of thermocouple probe heat flux measurement technique

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Fig. 5

Schematic details of the voltage measurement technique

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Fig. 6

Velocity profile in wall coordinates: (a) at the thermocouple probe measurement location and (b) variation of velocity fluctuations

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Fig. 7

Heat flux measurement: (a) using thermocouple probe technique and (b) using thermocouple probe technique (with expanded scale)

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