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research-article

Effects of surface roughness and bend geometry on mass transfer in an S-shaped back to back bend at Reynolds number of 200,000

[+] Author and Article Information
Dong Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
wangdongnjust@163.com

Dan Ewing

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
dwewing@rogers.com

Dr. Chan Ching

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
chingcy@mcmaster.ca

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4038844 History: Received May 30, 2017; Revised November 21, 2017

Abstract

Experiments were performed to investigate the local development of roughness and its effect on mass transfer in an S-shaped bend at Reynolds number of 200,000. The tests were performed over four consecutive time periods using a 203 mm diameter test section with a dissolving gypsum lining to water in a closed flow loop at a Schmidt number of 1200. The surface roughness and mass transfer over the test periods were measured using X-ray CT scans of the surface. Two regions of high mass transfer are found: along the intrados of the first and second bend. The surface roughness in these two regions, characterized by the height-to-spacing ratio, grows more rapidly than in the upstream pipe. There is an increase in the mass transfer with time, which corresponds well with the local increase in the height-to-spacing ratio of the roughness. The two regions of high mass transfer enhancement in the bend can be attributed to both a roughness effect and flow effect due to the bend geometry. The geometry effect was determined by normalizing the local mass transfer with that in a straight pipe with equivalent surface roughness. The mass transfer enhancement due to the geometry effect was found to be relatively constant for the two high mass transfer regions, with a value of approximately 1.5.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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