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research-article

Near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene/SiC multilayers

[+] Author and Article Information
Liang-Ying Zhong

Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031, China
1406169830@qq.com

Qi-Mei Zhao

Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031, China
1294856741@qq.com

Tong-Biao Wang

Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031, China
tbwang@ncu.edu.cn

Tian-Bao Yu

Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031, China
yutianbao@ncu.edu.cn

Qing-Hua Liao

Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031, China
lqhua@ncu.edu.cn

Nian-Hua Liu

Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031, China
nhliu@ncu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039221 History: Received October 09, 2017; Revised January 07, 2018

Abstract

A hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) alternately stacked by graphene and silicon carbide (SiC) is proposed to theoretically study near-field radiative heat transfer. Heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) are calculated using the effective medium theory (EMT). We observe that HMMs can exhibit better heat transfer characteristic than graphene-covered SiC bulks when appropriate SiC thickness and chemical potentials of graphene are selected. Transfer matrix method is also employed to calculate HTC between HMMs with thicker SiC given the invalidity of EMT in this case. We deduce that with increasing SiC thickness, HTC first increases rapidly and then decreases slowly when it reaches maximum value. HTC is high for graphene with small chemical potential. Results may benefit applications of thermophotovoltaic devices.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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