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RESEARCH PAPERS

J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):193-201. doi:10.1115/1.3686063.

Results of extensive numerical studies of simple linearly tapered radiating fins are presented in a novel design-oriented manner. A noniterative optimization procedure is made possible by this presentation scheme. The optimization of fin geometry allows for consideration of associated structure whose weight depends on the fin length. The importance of considering this structure in selecting fin geometry is demonstrated.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):203-207. doi:10.1115/1.3686066.

Integral transforms are used in the application of the weighted residual methods to the solution of problems in heat conduction. The procedure followed consists in reducing the given partial differential equation to an ordinary differential equation by successive applications of appropriate integral transforms, and finding its solution by using the weighted-residual methods. The undetermined coefficients contained in this solution are functions of transform variables. By inverting these functions the coefficients are obtained as functions of the actual variables.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):209-213. doi:10.1115/1.3686069.

The heat-transfer characteristics of two-dimensional, incompressible, turbulent wall jets are discussed. An analytical prediction is made for the local Stanton number and data are presented for a step wall temperature distribution. The method for extending these data to arbitrary heating conditions is shown. Temperature surveys in the wall jet boundary layer are also presented.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):215-220. doi:10.1115/1.3686072.

Experimental measurements are presented for the nucleate boiling of benzene, diphenyl, and benzene-diphenyl mixtures on a 3/8 -in. od horizontal tube. The data were obtained in a pool boiling apparatus at pressures ranging from 13.5 to 488.5 psia. For the pure fluids, the nucleate boiling heat-transfer data were best correlated by the Rohsenow [12], Gilmour [8], and Levy [10] equations. Critical heat flux data reported for these fluids are correlated with those in the literature. The critical heat flux values for the pure fluids were best correlated by the Bernath relationship [1]; however, none of the literature expressions adequately predicted the large increases in critical heat flux that were obtained when small percentages of benzene were added to diphenyl. Similar increases in critical heat flux, when small amounts of volatile components are added, have been noted before, but no generalized correlations have been advanced. Some of the discrepancy may be due to inadequate knowledge of physical property data for the mixtures and failure to account for the mass transfer which occurs in bubble growth of multicomponent mixtures.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):221-226. doi:10.1115/1.3686075.

The two hydrodynamic transitions which take place in nucleate boiling off a horizontal surface are described. The first, which is governed by continuity considerations, results in a change in the vapor removal process from an intermittent to a continuous one. The second, which is a result of a Taylor-Helmholtz instability, determines the maximum (“burnout”) heat flux. Equations are presented which predict with good accuracy the two transition heat fluxes.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):230-235. doi:10.1115/1.3686079.

Detailed analysis of heat transfer of an isothermal spanwise strip in a uniform shear field is presented. Solutions for the leading edge and the trailing edge are obtained by method of relaxation. These solutions are exact in that the streamwise heat conduction term, in the differential equation of energy, is not neglected. The results are compared with the Lévêque similarity solution, and the ranges where the solution is valid are defined. A similarity solution for the trailing wake is also presented.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):237-243. doi:10.1115/1.3686082.

In this paper, empirical equations of local as well as average heat-transfer coefficients of single jet system were derived. Two aspects of multiple jet systems have been studied. One concerns mainly the uniform distribution of heat-transfer coefficients and economy of power consumption. The other concerns the high magnitude of heat-transfer coefficients and the interference among jets. The experiments were conducted at Reynolds number from 103 to 104 and hole size from 1/8 to 1/4 in. diameter. An attempt was made to correlate empirical data to render practical application possible.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):246-256. doi:10.1115/1.3686087.

When a cold slab travels at speed U through a liquid metal bath, it freezes out metal at the rate of V. It is shown that the problem of determining the heat-transfer coefficient h at the interface of the liquid and solid phases is equivalent—under certain simplifying assumptions—to solving the (time-independent) wave equation in a sector. For the case of α ≡ arctan V/U < π/4, treated in the present paper, the problem is reduced, through suitable changes of variables and a Fourier sine transform, to the solution of Dirichlet’s problem for the Laplace equation. The temperature field T(X, Y) is expressed as an inverse sine transform, involving a single integration (in the transform variable). One finds that at the entrance cross section to the bath, X = 0, the heat-transfer coefficient is zero, then it rapidly approaches the asymptotic (“fully developed”) value h = γcV cos α. The heat-transfer coefficient is determined in closed form for α = π/6, π/4, and asymptotic expressions of it are derived for very small and very large distances from the origin when α is arbitrary (0 < α < π/4). Numerical evaluation of the heat-transfer coefficient at the solid-liquid interface is carried out for α = π/36, π/12, π/4. Plots of the temperature field T for these angles are also shown, along rays ϑ = π/6, π/3, π/2 to the horizontal.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):261-268. doi:10.1115/1.3686092.

The peak and minimum boiling heat fluxes for a variety of fluids are correlated with pressure, with geometry as a parameter. These correlations are achieved with the use of nondimensionalizing functions of invariant fluid properties that are based upon Zuber’s proposed mechanism for the extreme heat fluxes and upon the Law of Corresponding States. The method of correlation is applied with success to data from the literature as well as to new measurements provided by the authors. A clear contribution of geometry is identified.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):273-277. doi:10.1115/1.3686097.

Average heat-transfer coefficients are presented for four fin arrays positioned with the base vertical, 45 degrees, and horizontal while dissipating heat to room air. The fins are analyzed as constant-temperature surfaces since the lowest fin efficiency encountered was greater than 98 percent. It was found that coefficients for the vertical arrays fell 10 to 30 percent below those of similarly spaced parallel plates. The 45-degree arrays yielded results 5 to 20 percent below those of the vertical. Two flow patterns were investigated for the horizontal arrays, and it was found that the coefficients could be reduced sharply by preventing three-dimensional flow.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

DISCUSSIONS

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):281-282. doi:10.1115/1.3686102.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):282-283. doi:10.1115/1.3686103.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):284-285. doi:10.1115/1.3686105.
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):285-286. doi:10.1115/1.3686106.
Abstract
Topics: Flow (Dynamics) , Heat
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Heat Transfer. 1963;85(3):287-288. doi:10.1115/1.3686107.

The use of geometric mean beam lengths as compared to the use of geometric absorption factors for evaluation of energy transfer by radiation heat transfer with a participating gas is examined for perpendicular rectangles.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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